April 2014 Newsletter

April 2014 Newsletter

“C” is for Courage!

 

Shadow Book Inspires Lessons in Courage

Courage isn’t just for superheroes. Our teacher have been reading the new children’s book, The Boy Who Learned Upside Down and building lesson plans that help struggling students identify themselves as courageous learners. Check out our short video from the Peninsula School book launch in NE Portland, where Melody Finamori’s students drew cartoon strips of themselves being courageous. Boy is based on the real-life story of one child’s courageous journey from “I can’t” to “I CAN!” that led to the creation of The Shadow Project.

Read more on our website


Shadow Student Raises Funds for Class iPad

When 9-year-old Caelen Ough decided his fellow students in The Shadow Project at Duniway Elementary’s special education program needed an iPad he created a video and posted it on a fundraising website. Within a week, Caelen had raised $615 from 15 donors (exceeding his goal by $15). “The iPad can help kids with disabilities learn new things, read books and play games like chess,” said Caelen, who got the idea by studying the iPad in his mainstream classroom.

Read more on our website!


Special Education teacher Janice Holstine joins Shadow’s board

We were happy to welcome Janice Holstine to our Shadow Project board of directors. Janice has been a special education teacher at Marysville School for three years and uses Shadow in her classroom. Janice says “I am so excited about how this program helps teachers provide resources to nurture and support the growth of students who may have given up.” At Marysville, she also serves on the Equity Team, a Portland Public Schools effort to encourage “Courageous Conversations” regarding equity for children from racial and ethnic minorities.

Read more about Janice and her background!


Thank You for Making a Difference

We are so grateful to The Collins Foundation, which awarded Shadow a $36,000 grant over two years to help transform The Shadow Project’s program delivery model to improve educational outcomes for children with learning differences; and to the Meyer Memorial Trust, which awarded Shadow $40,000 over two years for operating support. Meyer works with and invests in organizations, communities, ideas and efforts that contribute to a flourishing and equitable Oregon.

Read more about these recent supporters


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City of Portland’s “Making a Difference” Award in Education

The Shadow Project

Toll free: 1-888-747-0005

Email: Shadow@shadow-project.org

www.shadow-project.org

 

Special Education teacher Janice Holstine joins Shadow’s board

Special Education teacher Janice Holstine joins Shadow’s board

We are happy to welcome Janice Holstine to our Shadow Project board of directors. Janice has been a special education teacher at Marysville School for three years and uses Shadow in her classroom. At Marysville, she also serves on the Equity Team, a Portland Public Schools effort to encourage “Courageous Conversations” regarding equity for children from racial and ethnic minorities.

Her first job with the school district was as a para-educator at Metropolitan Learning Center,where she worked with a special education student from the time she was in 5th grade until she graduated from high school. Her passion for working with students with learning challenges only grew from there. She is currently pursuing her Masters of Education through the Leadership program at Concordia University.

On why Janice joined the Shadow Project board, she shares “I wanted a way to give back to The Shadow Project because it has done so much for my students and classroom. I am so excited about how this program helps teachers like me to provide resources to nurture and support the growth of students who may have given up.” Thank you Janice, we are so happy to have you!

Shadow Book Inspires Lessons in Courage

Courage isn’t just for superheroes. Our teacher have been reading the new children’s book, The Boy Who Learned Upside Down and building lesson plans that help struggling students identify themselves as courageous learners. Check out our short video from the Peninsula School book launch in NE Portland, where Melody Finamori’s students drew cartoon strips of themselves being courageous. Boy is based on the real-life story of one child’s courageous journey from “I can’” to “I CAN!” that led to the creation of The Shadow Project.

A terrific true story about coping with learning challenges and accepting differences”  – Midwest Children’s Bookwatch.

“An upbeat message on a subject rarely written about”.  – Library Journal.

The Oregonian “The Boy Who Learned Upside Down’ aims to inspire kids with learning disabilities (and their parents)” – January 4, 2014

Buy the Book:
Available at Amazon, Powell’s bookstore and other online and retail booksellers.
Sales benefit Portland area students with learning disabilities

Synopsis:

Alex is a kid with learning disabilities who’s miserable at school. When he tries to read a book, the letters sprout arms, legs, skateboards – even stilettos – and escape off the page.  “I give up!” he says. “Why can’t I just be like everyone else?”  Then something amazing happens. His teacher challenges Alex to become a courageous student – something that seems impossible for a kid like him. With the help of his dog Shadow, Alex sets off on one adventure after another in pursuit of his goal. Along the way, he learns to help others, to believe in himself and to turn “I can’t” into “I CAN!”

The Boy Who Learned Upside Down
Based on a True Story
Black Heron Press, Nov. 2013

Grades 1-5
By Christy Scattarella
Illustrations by Winky Wheeler

Shadow Student Raises Funds for Class iPad

Shadow Student Raises Funds for Class iPad

When 9-year-old Caelen Ough decided his fellow students in The Shadow Project at Duniway Elementary’s special education program needed an iPad he created a video and posted it on a fundraising website. Within a week, Caelen had raised $615 from 15 donors (exceeding his goal by $15). “The iPad can help kids with disabilities learn new things, read books and play games like chess,” said Caelen, who got the idea by studying the iPad in his mainstream classroom.

Caelen didn’t reveal his plan to special ed teacher Kathy Domingue until after he raised the money. Then he promptly took Kathy and his mother shopping for an iPad mini and cover. “I’m very proud of Caelen for thinking of other children and how he can help out,” said Kathy.

Caelen is an outstanding student who has been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. “My learning challenge is saying the things I really want to say. I get confused sometimes and it feels like my brain is bouncing from wall to wall,” he said.

His mother, Kedma Ough, said she hopes Caelen’s gift to Duniway students in The Shadow Project will raise awareness about the capabilities of children with special needs, and inspire other students to achieve their potential. “Every child has a voice that needs to be heard,” she said.

The Boy Who Learned Upside Down

“The Boy Who Learned Upside Down” is a children’s book based on the true story of Alex, a Portland child with learning disabilities, and Shadow, the dog who loved him. Alex’s courageous journey from “I can’t” to “I CAN!” inspired a program called The Shadow Project that has helped more than 6,500 local special education students to thrive in school.